As a parent you may find much joy in watching your child grow and develop. Within the first year so many changes occur and at such a rapid pace it is hard to keep up. These important changes are also known as milestones. From the moment you first meet your baby to producing their first words you are there to track your baby's development. Below is a list of important language milestones and red flags to look for in the first year of life.

 

Age Range                Typical Language Behaviors

0-1 mos.               Startle response to sound; quieted by human voice.

2-3 mons.             Cooing; production of some vowel sounds; response to speech; babbling.

4-6 mons.         Babbling strings of syllables; imitation of sounds; variations in pitch and loudness.

7-9 mons.             Comprehension of some words and simple requests; increased imitation of speech sounds;                 may    say or imitate "mama" or "dada."

10-12 mons.         `Understanding of "No"; response to requests; response to own name; production of one or more words.

 

Speech and language milestones:

Click on the links below to see more information of important milestones for your child.

0-6 Months

7-12 Months

Developmental Red Flags (0-3 mons.)

  • Does not respond to loud noises

  • Does not follow moving objects with eyes by 3 months

  • Doesn't smile at the sound of your voice by 2 months

  • Doesn't grasp and hold objects by 3 months

  • Doesn't smile at people by 3 months

  • Cannot support head well at 3 months

  • Doesn't reach for and grasp toys by 4 months

  • Doesn't bring objects to mouth by 4 months

  • Doesn't push down with legs when feet are placed on a firm surface by 4 months

  • Has trouble moving one or both eyes in all directions

  • Crosses eyes most of the time (occasional crossing of the eyes is normal in these first months)

Developmental Red Flags (4-7 mons)

  • Seems very stiff, tight muscles

  • Seems very floppy, like a rag doll

  • Head still flops back when body is pulled to sitting position (by 5 months still exhibits head lag)

  • Shows no affection for the person who cares for them

  • Doesn't seem to enjoy being around people

  • One or both eyes consistently turn in or out

  • Respond with big smiles by age 5 months?

  • Turn and look in response to new sounds by age 6 months?

  • Persistent tearing, eye drainage, or sensitivity to light

  • Does not respond to sounds around them

  • Has difficulty getting objects to mouth

  • Does not turn head to locate sounds by 4 months

  • Doesn't roll over (stomach to back) by 6 months

  • Cannot sit with help by 6 months (not by themselves)

  • Does not laugh or make squealing sounds by 5 months

  • Does not actively reach for objects by 6 months

  • Does not follow objects with both eyes

  • Does not bear some weight on legs by 5 months

This list is to be used as a resource only. If you have any concerns based on this list, please contact your child's pediatrician. An evaluation of their development may need to be done.

Developmental Red Flags (8-12 mons.)

Does not show interest in games like "peek-a-boo" or "patty cake" by 9 months.

  • Does not engage in turn taking activities with facial expression or eye gaze by 8 months

  • Does not crawl

  • Drags one side of body while crawling (for over one month)

  • Does not stand when supported

  • Does not sit steadily by 10 months.

  • Does not babble by 10 months (dadada, bababa, mamama)

  • Does not search for objects that are hidden (object permeance) by 10-12 months

  • Does not point and/or use gestures (waving hi/bye, shaking head no/yes, etc) by 12 months

  • Does not coo or babble during play by 12 months

  • Does not imitate large motor movements or imitate vocalizations by 12 months

  • Does not have at least one word (ex. mama) that is used consistently by 13 months

  • Does not understand simple words like "mama" or "juice" by 12 months

 

This list is to be used as a resource only. If you have any concerns based on this list, please contact your child's pediatrician. An evaluation of their development may need to be done